Religion in America

When I was in high school, I went to a very good liberal arts school, which is probably why I like history, politics and religion. I’m not bragging, I am merely explaining why I write about these things often. Over the course of a period of two years, I read over 2,000 pages studying religion in America. Different sects, different ideologies, different inceptions. I’ve read the Bible at lengths, the Talmud, curiously enough I haven’t read the Koran.

With Easter approaching I read a number of Newsweek articles talking about the US as a post-Christian nation. For the most part you shouldn’t think of post-Christian America as there being less believers in God. Rather it means that religion has less of an impact on the policies and laws of the United States. For instance most Christians are opposed to gay marriage, abortion, and evolution. However religious conservatives, have lost those battles regarding the teaching of evolution and in Iowa gay marriage was ruled legal last Friday.

Religion has always been a matter of faith. You either believe in God or you don’t. I think it is dismissive to say there is no God. The world and universe is pretty dazzling and to come about by random processes and form into a complex world, wouldn’t put the existence of a higher being out of order. The question is rather who is this higher being, is he the Christian God?

What attracts people to religion?Various things. Some people like religion because it gives them a sense of security. Some people like religion because it gives them a nice environment to be in. Some people like to believe their life has a higher purpose. Some people like religion because they are scared. Various reasons, and I’m not saying any of them are bad reasons.

I argue grasping religion is the of the hardest things ever. You are trying to grasp something that is intangible. You cannot see God, you can only believe. But contrary to misguided opinion. I don’t believe questioning your faith is unhealthy, exploring and finding answers on your own is important to strengthening your faith.

When it comes to following “rules”, i.e “dogma” because it is so hard in religion. The term cafeteria Christians has been thrown around. Christians that choose what they want to believe. A simple example, honesty, and treating people well is important to me. On social issues I am lax. For other people cursing is a big deal, for me I let it slide. While some of my friends would argue for Christan laws, and moving toward theocracy.

Some random questions:

Is it un-Christian to support people who have un-Christian values?
How Christian are you really?
How many of us say one thing and do another?

Should we date with the intention of marriage?
Even though most relationships fail early off.

Why do people equate tradition with religion?

i.e Bob Jones University a protestant fundamentalist University, in South Carolina. Prohibited interracial dating until 2000, because it said that “God intended segregation of the races and that the Scriptures forbid interracial marriage.”

In short yes it is complex.